How Babe Ruth Became America’s Baseball Legend

George Herman Ruth Jr., otherwise known as Babe Ruth, is a true American legend. He started his epic baseball career as a star left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox and played in the Major League for 22 seasons. He is recognized as one of the greatest sports heroes in American History, and many people consider him the greatest baseball player of all time.

Babe Ruth as a left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox. Ca. 1914-19.
Babe Ruth as a left-handed pitcher for the Boston Red Sox. Ca. 1914-19. Photo By Courtesy Everett Collection/Shutterstock

Born in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1895, young Ruth had a classic working-class upbringing. His father worked odd jobs to support his family before owning his own business. In the meantime, Babe Ruth grew up in his maternal grandfather’s home. At the tender age of seven, Babe Ruth was sent to a reformatory, the St. Mary’s Industrial School for Boys. In 1914, he signed with the Baltimore Orioles before getting sold to the Boston Red Sox.

His incredible career spanned from 1914 to 1935. This is the life and career of the all-American sport’s icon, Babe Ruth.

Accomplished Player

Babe Ruth was famously left-handed. When he was just a little kid, he was forced to wear the standard readily available right-hand glove on his left hand. Obviously, the gloves didn’t affect his game. Ruth was part of “The Murderers’ Row,” the renowned 1927 New York Yankee’s line-up, known for their threatening talent and power. Another famous “Murderer” is Lou Gehrig, another influential baseball star.

Group portrait of the 1926 New York Yankees baseball team, including Babe Ruth in the center of the back row.
Group portrait of the 1926 New York Yankees baseball team, including Babe Ruth in the center of the back row. Photo By The Art Archive/Shutterstock

Ruth was one of the first five players inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame. Throughout his impressive career, Ruth ended up with a string of nicknames. Some of the most epic were “The Great Bambino,” “The Sultan of Swat,” and “The Behemoth of Bust…” I think you get the picture.

Rebellious Phase

Ruth’s parents got divorced when he was just a youngster, and the split had long-lasting effects on the child. His dad was busy and inattentive, which caused Ruth to act out by skipping school and hanging out in the streets. The baseball star admitted that when his father wasn’t looking, he liked to sneak beer. According to his biographer Robert W. Creamer, Ruth “was one of the great natural misbehavers of all time.”

Babe Ruth with Baseball Bats
Babe Ruth with Baseball Bats. Photo By Globe Photos/Mediapunch/Shutterstock

We mentioned how seven-year-old Ruth was sent to a reformatory school, but we don’t know the exact reason why. Some reports state that there was a violent incident with his dad. However, his school-record documented that he was “incorrigible.” Harsh words. I bet they didn’t expect him to become a sports star.

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