The Iconic Paranormal Franchise: Ghostbusters

As a franchise, Ghostbusters had an interesting run. The first one was considered a childhood treasure by a generation of fans and the last one supposedly ruined the childhood of that same group of fans. And then there’s also that one in the middle that no one seems to speak about since it wasn’t very memorable.

Left to right: Harold Ramis, Dan Aykroyd, Ernie Hudson (background) and Bill Murray
Left to right: Harold Ramis, Dan Aykroyd, Ernie Hudson (background), and Bill Murray in a scene from the film ‘Ghostbusters,’ directed by Ivan Reitman, 1984. Photo by Columbia Pictures/Getty Images

Either way, Ghostbusters is one of the funniest and most creative movies of all time that bought a comedy dream team together. And then, 30 years later, did it again. If you are a Ghostbusters fan, this one is for you. Check out these amazing facts about the franchise.

Paranormal DNA

It seems like Dan Aykord’s destiny was to create Ghostbusters. He always had an obsession with the paranormal, and the fascination runs deep in his family. From his great-grandfather to his father, the men in the Aykroyd family have been consistently investigating and trying to communicate with the spirit world.

Left to right: Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, and Harold Ramis
Left to right: Bill Murray, Dan Aykroyd, and Harold Ramis as paranormal investigators in Ivan Reitman’s 1984 comedy ‘Ghostbusters.’ Photo by Columbia Pictures/Archive Photos/Getty Images

Dan inherited this love for the supernatural and subsequently saw the potential for a film based on spirits and created Ghostbusters. Shortly after, he starred on a show called Psi Factor: Chronicles of the Paranormal, which was established by his brother, Peter Aykroyd.

Ghost Stories

Before the film even got the green light from Columbia Pictures, Aykroyd had already finished the script. However, it was far from the completed version that we saw on screen. The final product was written by Aykroyd, Harold Ramis, and Ivan Reitman. They worked on it for about two weeks in the Aykroyd’s basement in Martha’s Vineyard.

A smiling Rick Moranis looking up at Sigourney Weaver in a scene from the film 'Ghostbusters,' 1984.
A smiling Rick Moranis looking up at Sigourney Weaver in a scene from the film ‘Ghostbusters,’ 1984. Photo by Columbia Pictures/Getty Images

Aykroyd’s drew inspiration for the tone and feel of the movie from different areas. But mainly, the ghost projects of comedic geniuses like Bob Hope, Abbott and Costello, and the Bowery Boys.

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